Weight Management

How Can Men Do Kegel Exercises?

6 Get-Your-Body-Back Moves for New Moms
Researchers from Abertay University in Dundee pictured said short sessions of high intensity exercise could help ease the 'astronomical' cost of ill-health in the elderly. Share this article Share. Try to do this 10 times per session, three times a day. Harrowing moment rare white tiger tries to nurse Bringing baby along in a front pack will add extra weight that can increase the benefits. From a boiling kettle to TV static these are the eight most common Seeing results with any exercise takes time, so be patient.

What Are Kegel Exercises for Men?

Kegel Exercises: Treating Male Urinary Incontinence

Kegels are exercises that help you zero in on and strengthen muscles below the bladder that help control urination. In men, urinary incontinence can be caused by a weak urinary sphincter that may result from surgery for prostate cancer , an overactive bladder , or a bladder that doesn't contract. Kegel exercises can help you improve -- or in some cases completely regain -- bladder control. Kegels are easy to do, once you know which muscles to target.

One of the easiest ways to locate your muscles is during urination. Some men find these muscles by imagining that they are trying to stop the passage of gas. Squeezing these muscles gives a pulling sensation; these are the right muscles for pelvic exercises.

It's important not to contract other muscles. Some men need biofeedback to help them target the right muscles.

It may also be easier to contract the muscles for just two or three seconds at first. That puts more weight on the muscles, boosting your workout and improving your control.

Seeing results with any exercise takes time, so be patient. If you do Kegels three times a day, you should see better bladder control in three to six weeks -- some men see it even sooner. It can be hard to find time away from your baby in the early months, so try these exercises that you can do with your infant. Take caution when completing them. You may want to practice first using a doll or a rolled-up blanket or towel that's the same size as your baby. Make sure you're fit enough, and have a good enough sense of balance, to assure your and your baby's safety.

Here are some moves that will help you get your body ready for regular exercise. Lie on your back with your arms along your sides. Keeping your lower back flush to the floor, bend your knees with your feet flat on the floor. Relax your belly as you inhale. As you exhale, slowly lift your head and neck off the floor.

Inhale as you lower your head back down. When you can do 10 head lifts with ease, try this move. Get in the same position you did for head lifts. Inhale and relax your belly. As you exhale, raise your head and your shoulders off the floor, reaching your arms and hands toward your knees. Inhale as you lower your head and shoulders back down. When you can do 10 shoulder lifts, move on to this. Start in the same position on the floor.

Lift your torso until it's about halfway between your knees and the floor behind you. Reach toward your knees and hold for 2 to 5 seconds. Then, slowly lower yourself down.

Don't forget to breathe. Exhale when you exert. Inhale when you relax. Bonus Workouts for Baby and Mom It can be hard to find time away from your baby in the early months, so try these exercises that you can do with your infant.

Holding your baby close to your chest, do a forward lunge with your left leg take a big step forward and bend your knee. Then return to starting position and lunge with the opposite leg. This will help strengthen your legs, back muscles, and core.

Repeat times on each side. This move is similar to the baby glider, but instead of forward lunges, do side lunges -- stepping to the side instead of to the front -- and do a squat. Repeat times to each side. Rock-a-baby squats and curls: Stand with your legs shoulder-width apart. Holding your baby tight and close to your chest, squat down, allowing your baby's feet to touch the floor.

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